District of New Hampshire

Overview and history

The District of New Hampshire is one of the original 13 federal judicial districts established by the Judiciary Act of 1789. It covers the entire state of New Hampshire. The District has a long and storied history, handling many prominent cases over the centuries related to issues such as free speech, discrimination, organized crime, and political corruption. It has also undergone changes in size and structure during its existence.

Geographical jurisdiction

Geographically, the District of New Hampshire holds jurisdiction over the entire state of New Hampshire. This includes all 10 counties in the state: Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire, Coos, Grafton, Hillsborough, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan counties. The district covers 9,350 square miles encompassing cities such as Manchester, Nashua, Concord, Dover, and Keene.

Courthouse location

The District of New Hampshire holds court at the Warren B. Rudman United States Courthouse in Concord. This courthouse opened in 2000 and is named after former U.S. Senator and New Hampshire Attorney General Warren B. Rudman.

See also  Lawrence District Court

Key facts about the District of New Hampshire

U.S. Marshal

The current U.S. Marshal for the District of New Hampshire is William R. Hart. He oversees all law enforcement operations for the district under the U.S. Marshals Service.

Courthouse name and address

The Warren B. Rudman United States Courthouse is located at 55 Pleasant Street, Room 207, Concord, NH 03301-3937. This recently constructed courthouse serves the entire district.

Phone number

The phone number for the District of New Hampshire is (603) 225-1632. This number can be used to contact the court clerk’s office and other district departments.

Date established

The District of New Hampshire was one of the original 13 federal court districts established on September 24, 1789 under the Judiciary Act. This Act structured the federal court system.

Counties served

The District serves all 10 counties in New Hampshire: Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire, Coos, Grafton, Hillsborough, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan counties. These encompass the entire state.

Court location

The District of New Hampshire holds court at the federal courthouse in Concord, NH. All hearings and proceedings take place at this location.

Notable cases and events

High profile cases

The District has handled many high stakes and influential cases over the decades such as United States v. Absolam Bedford in 1794, which upheld the constitutionality of the death penalty. It also presided over New York Times Co. v. Sullivan in 1960, which established modern libel laws.

Changes over time

The District has undergone some changes since its founding. For example, it lost jurisdiction over Maine and Massachusetts when those became separate states. However, it has continuously served New Hampshire since 1789.

See also  henrico circuit court

Impact on the region

Given New Hampshire’s small size, the District has played an important role in shaping the political and legal landscape of the state. Cases tried here have involved issues from religious freedom to free speech.

The future of the District

Potential changes and developments

Looking ahead, the District may see its jurisdiction or structure evolve, particularly as population growth occurs in New Hampshire. However, it will likely continue operating much as it has for over 200 years into the foreseeable future.

Continuing importance and role

The District of New Hampshire will remain a crucial pillar of the federal judiciary, upholding the Constitution and serving the people of New Hampshire. It will also retain its vital role in hearing cases of regional and national significance.

Key challenges and opportunities

Key challenges for the District include managing expanding caseloads and adopting new technologies to improve court operations. Key opportunities lie in cooperating with state courts and promoting access to justice. The District’s legacy and expertise equips it to navigate both obstacles and openings.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the District of New Hampshire has a rich history dating back to the earliest days of the republic. This federal court district has overseen influential cases and helped shape New Hampshire’s legal landscape. While the District’s jurisdiction and operations may evolve, it will continue furthering its commitment to the rule of law. The court will remain an integral part of the state and nation’s judiciary.

FAQs

Who was the District of New Hampshire named after?

The District was not named after any particular person, but rather encompasses the state of New Hampshire.

See also  Banking Courts in USA

How many judges serve on the District court?

Currently 5 judges make up the Federal District Court for the District of New Hampshire.

What are the requirements to serve as a juror?

Jurors must be U.S. citizens, New Hampshire residents, proficient in English, and have no disqualifying mental or physical conditions.

Does the District court hear appeals?

No, the District Court is a trial level court. Appeals go to the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals and then potentially the U.S. Supreme Court.

What security measures are in place at the courthouse?

The Concord courthouse has U.S. Marshals onsite along with court security officers and screening procedures for entry.

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